Stress Is not All Just In Your Head

Stress Is Not All Just In Your Head

Everyone experiences  the effects of stress at some time.  Anxiety over a relationship….financial…frustration at work…the list is endless.  But, wherever it is coming from it is not “all in your head!

Do you wake up with the worst “what if’s”?  Worry about it all day, weeks?  Soon it is anxiety.   If your problem is ongoing, it can become a new normal…extra stress hormones floating around, then inflammation.

Adrenalin can be helpful in danger situations, such as survival in the event of an attack.  But over time it is very damaging.

Effects of Chronic Stress

Effects of Stress
Effects of Stress

Chronic stress interferes with your immune system, causes inflammation and then leading to chronic diseases.  Before long you may trigger high blood pressure, asthma and keep getting everything that is going around.

Stress gains momentum, growing until suddenly it crashes.  This could be at the expense of your health. You have trouble sleeping and and on emotional level you feel like burn-out.

Psychological stress is misleading, because no stress is only psychological…it’s not just all in your head.

When stress is chronic, your immune system becomes desensitized to cortisol, and inflammation is partly regulated by this hormone,  this decreased sensitivity raises the inflammatory response and allows inflammation to get out of control.  Chronic inflammation is the root of heart disease and many chronic diseases. Read More

Could You Be Sleep Deprived?

Could You Be Sleep Deprived?

Are you always tired?  If your answer is yes, then we can assume that you are not getting enough sleep. Although there are other signs that may not be as obvious.

Sleep Deprived
Sleep Deprived

These are More Signs That Your Sleep Needs Revamping

You’ve Gained Weight

A lack of sleep promotes metabolic dysfunction that fuels weight gain.  Losing as little as 30 minutes of sleep a night can disrupt your metabolism enough to cause weight gain.

Your Memory Fails You.

The process of brain growth, or neuroplasticity, is believed to underlie your brain’s capacity to control behavior that includes learning and memory.  Synaptic plasticity plays a large role in learning and memory in the brain.  These connections are strengthened while you sleep, so being sleep deprived interferes with these processes.

Your Reaction Time Slows

Researchers have determined that sleep deprivation is particularly problematic for decision-making.  Some of these include decisions for uncertain and unexpected change  affected while you are driving or on the job. Read More

Disrupted Circadian Rhythm Can Make You Hungrier and Forgetful

 Your Circadian Rhythm Can Make You Hungrier and Forgetful

As you probably know, the physiological functions of virtually all organisms are governed by 24-hour circadian rhythms.  The modern, round-the-clock lifestyle, made possible by electric lighting, could disrupt your circadian rhythm  and interfere with leaning abilities.  Your lack of sleep due to an over loaded calendar, e-mail, web surfing and TV could take a toll on your health whether you realize it or not.  This is a  surefire way to dysregulate your circadian rhythm.  This can contribute to a whole host of chronic health problems, since your circadian system “drives” the biological activity at the cellular level.  Disruptions can cascade outward throughout your entire body.

Circadian Rhythm
Circadian Rhythm

Disrupted Sleep Patterns Can Impact Your Health

Your circadian clock influences :

Short term memory-Your circadian clock controls your daily cycle of sleep and wakefulness by alternately inhibiting  and exciting different parts of your brain through regulating the release of certain neurotransmitters.  This part of your brain is known as the hippocampus. This must be excited in order for the things you learn to be organized in such a way that you’ll remember them later. If your internal clock isn’t functioning properly, it causes the release of too much GABA.  Excess GABA can lead to short term memory loss and inability to retain new information. Read More