Digestion: How Food Combining Matters

Digestion:  How Food Combining Matters

Millions of Americans are plagued with heartburn, abdominal pain, bloating, gas, nausea, bowel difficulties and other digestive problems.  Much more than inconvenient, these are telltale signs of poor digestion-result in in deficiency and toxicity.  To eliminate these problems, follow a few simple guidelines, which will support healthy digestion.  You can choose digestion habits that will bring nutrients into your cells and let wastes out of your body efficiently.

The basic steps for food combining that matters are:

Eat the right combinations of foods, because certain foods digest better together than others.

Chew your food well, to assist in the digestive process.  Nutrients must be absorbed properly through your intestinal walls and transported throughout your body to all the cells that need them.

Wastes must excrete from the body.

Deficiency may occur if food is not properly digested and absorbed.  Toxicity occurs when undigested food “sits” too long, either in the stomach or in the intestines, where  it rots, ferments and putrefies, creating toxins.

Although eating a variety of foods is a great idea, we are not designed to digest them all at the same time.  Learning which foods go well with each other is what “food combining” is all about.  Our digestive system has adapted and evolved over thousands of years; until recently humankind did not eat the combinations of foods that are now “normal”.  Our hunter-gatherer ancestors often ate one food at a time directly from the source.  They had no way to preserve or store them.

When we are young, our digestive systems are working at peak performance and indulging in digestive indiscretions may be possible.  As we age, digestive capacity diminishes.  Forcing the body to digest incompatible foods which results in improperly digested food that produces dangerous toxins.

Proteins digest in an acid environment, but starches digest in an alkaline environment.  You cannot create both at the same time.  Fruit has special digestive requirements and should be eaten alone.

Food combinations that work well together and those that do not, consider a few simple food categories: proteins, starches, vegetables, and fruits (sweet, acid and melons).

Vegetables with proteins, okay.
Vegetables with starches, okay
Eat fruit alone.

Not certain which food fall into which categories? Here are examples.

Protein: Eggs, meat, fish, fowl, nuts, seeds, avocado, sprouts, milk  products.

Starch: Corn, wheat, barley, rice, buckwheat, millet, oats, beans, potatoes, yams, squash, flour products, sugar

Vegetables: Asparagus, tomatoes, okra,  green beans, green peas, broccoli, bell peppers, brussels sprouts, cabbage, lettuce, celery, cucumber, beets, eggplant, spinach, mushrooms, zucchini, radish, artichoke, beets, carrots, cauliflower, chives, ginger, garlic, leeks, onions

Sweet fruits: Bananas, currants, figs, dates, raisins, prunes, dried fruits, grapes

Acid fruits: Lemons, oranges, grapefruits, other citrus fruits, kiwi, plum, pineapple, mango, papaya, all berries, nectarines, apples, cherries, pears, apricots, peaches.

Melons : Cantaloupe, watermelon

Many of our traditional meals are comprised of wrong combinations.  What we think of as a “good meal” are typically a harmful combination of starch and protein.  We make the problem worse by accompanying meals with sugary drinks and desserts; these combinations cause the food to ferment and putrefy in the digestive system.

So remember HOW FOOD COMBINING MATTERS!

I’m Shirley Noah, I teach the 9 pillars for health.  A step-by-step approach to good health.  Let’s connect to see how I may best serve you in the near future.

What is Your Stress Level?

What is Your Stress Level?What is your stress level?

How often do you practice the power of appreciation and an “attitude of gratitude” throughout the day?

How often do you practice a stress management method, meditation, etc?

How often do you feel “stressed out”?

Stress is your response to unusual demands made on you.  What is Your stress level?  You can respond positively or negatively, which is distress.  The effects of stress depend on your response to the demands.  Sometimes, you are your own worst enemy when it comes to stress.

Stress causes hormones in your hypothalamus (an are of your brain stem) to be secreted.  This causes the pituitary gland to stimulate the production of adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH).  ACTH travels through the blood stream from the pituitary gland to the adrenal gland.  The adrenal gland stimulates the release of cortisol.  Cortisol activates your brain’s reward center and increases levels of insulin in the blood stream, stimulating the desire for high-fat high-sugar foods.

Here are some ways to be more productive and help life to run smoother.

1.  Ask for help.  It’s OK to ask family and friends to help you out.  You do not get a Super Man award for trying to do it all.  In fact, you may be so overwhelmed that staying committed to your healthy lifestyle is much harder than when you have others to help you along the way.

2.  Keep exercising.  This can be tough when you feel as though you are being pulled in a thousand different directions.  As you are aware, exercise is a big stress reliever.  Even if you can’t keep up with your normal exercise routine, go for a quick walk or stair climbing.

3.  Rest is important.  Sleep and rest help us recharge our batteries.  This is when our body does repair work we need so much.

4.  Breathe.  Deep breathing seems like such a simple act, and it can do wonders in helping relieve stress and tension we hold in our bodies.  Just 3 short minutes of concentrated breathing can help lower stress levels and release tension and anxiety.

5.  Be sure to eat.  Remember food is fuel for the body.  It is what gives us energy especially when our meal time schedule is off.  Sugary foods and junk food from the vending machine can leave you drained, you can bring healthy snacks as a great option.  I keep nuts and protein bars in a special pack along with pure bottled water for those times when you are not expecting your schedule to be changed.

6.  Talk with others.  While it may seem you have an overwhelming situation, sharing your concerns with others you may find comfort that others may have had a similar experience.

7.  Accept that you cannot do it all.  This is by far one of the most difficult areas to accept.  As a type A perfectionist, I do not like when I am forced to shorten my workout sessions, maybe not eat as well as I should, and get upset with the way things are not done, but this is life.

8.  Trust.  Stephen Covey’s book Speed of Trust, says people must be able to trust before they feel it.

9.  It’s OK to let things slide.  I love an immaculate home, but when circumstances present themselves (which is often in life) we accept that there is only so much time in a day.  It’s OK to not get EVERYTHING done.  It will still be there when things settle down.

10.  Recognize when are being inefficient.  Do you get stuck answering e-mails for two hours at the expense of higher-value items?  Ask yourself, what’s my ultimate outcome that I want and will this achieve it?

I’m Shirley Noah, I teach the 9 pillars for health.  A step-by-step approach to good health.  Let’s connect to see how I may best serve you in the near future.