Change Your Greens For Sprouts To Meet Your Daily Vitamin Quota

CHANGE  YOUR GREENS FOR SPROUTS TO MEET YOUR DAILY VITAMIN QUOTA

“Let food be they medicine and medicine be thy food.” Hippocrates

VITAMIN CONTENT SKYROCKETS  WITH SPROUTED FOODS

Sprouts and Microgreens
Sprouts and Microgreens

Certain B-vitamins increase 1200 percent during the germination process.   Because sprouts also contain an abundance of highly-active antioxidants that prevent DNA destruction that also protect us from the ongoing effects of aging and cellular breakdown.  Sprouts like alfalfa, radish, broccoli, clover and mung bean contain concentrated amounts of petrochemicals that can protect against disease.  Johns Hopkins found that broccoli sprouts contain a substance called sulforaphane, a compound that helps mobilize the body’s natural cancer-fighting resources to reduce the risk of developing cancer.  Sprouts also contain a high source of fiber.  Many sprouts also contain plant estrogen’s, which have been helpful in controlling hot flashes, menopause, PMS symptoms and fibrocystic breast .  Alfalfa sprouts are a good source of another compound, saponins.  Saponins lower the bad cholesterol and fat but not the good HDL fats, and also stimulate the immune system by increasing the activity of natural killer cells such as T-lymphocytes and interferon.

CHANGE YOUR GREENS FOR SPROUTS

A simple way to improve your nutrition is to change out some of your lettuce for sprouts and/or microgreens in your salad, or on burgers, sandwiches or tacos.  You may also drop them in your smoothies.

Red Cabbage microgreens have a high concentration of ascorbic acid (Vit C)

Cilantro has the highest amount of caratenoids lutein and beta-carotene

Sunflower sprouts are high in phytosterols, which can lower cholesterol

Alfalfa is a good source of  Vitamins A, B, C, D, E, F and K

Wheatgrass is high in Vitamins B, C, E and many minerals

Lentil sprouts contain 26 percent protein and can be eaten without cooking

Brussels sprouts cooked, contain more than 240 percent of the recommended (RDA) for Vitamin K1, and nearly 130 percent of the RDA for Vitamin C.  They are a good source of fiber, manganese, potassium, choline, B vitamins, antioxidants and other health promoting phytochemicals.

Want to know a little more about this awesome resource for super nutrition? This is a practical guide with information on sprouts and sprouting methods.  Try this book by Ann Wigmore  The Sprouting Book

 

I am Shirley Noah, I teach the 9 Pillars for Health.  A step-by-step approach to good health.  Let’s connect to see how I may best serve you in the near future.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Digestion: How Food Combining Matters

Digestion:  How Food Combining Matters

Millions of Americans are plagued with heartburn, abdominal pain, bloating, gas, nausea, bowel difficulties and other digestive problems.  Much more than inconvenient, these are telltale signs of poor digestion-result in in deficiency and toxicity.  To eliminate these problems, follow a few simple guidelines, which will support healthy digestion.  You can choose digestion habits that will bring nutrients into your cells and let wastes out of your body efficiently.

The basic steps for food combining that matters are:

Eat the right combinations of foods, because certain foods digest better together than others.

Chew your food well, to assist in the digestive process.  Nutrients must be absorbed properly through your intestinal walls and transported throughout your body to all the cells that need them.

Wastes must excrete from the body.

Deficiency may occur if food is not properly digested and absorbed.  Toxicity occurs when undigested food “sits” too long, either in the stomach or in the intestines, where  it rots, ferments and putrefies, creating toxins.

Although eating a variety of foods is a great idea, we are not designed to digest them all at the same time.  Learning which foods go well with each other is what “food combining” is all about.  Our digestive system has adapted and evolved over thousands of years; until recently humankind did not eat the combinations of foods that are now “normal”.  Our hunter-gatherer ancestors often ate one food at a time directly from the source.  They had no way to preserve or store them.

When we are young, our digestive systems are working at peak performance and indulging in digestive indiscretions may be possible.  As we age, digestive capacity diminishes.  Forcing the body to digest incompatible foods which results in improperly digested food that produces dangerous toxins.

Proteins digest in an acid environment, but starches digest in an alkaline environment.  You cannot create both at the same time.  Fruit has special digestive requirements and should be eaten alone.

Food combinations that work well together and those that do not, consider a few simple food categories: proteins, starches, vegetables, and fruits (sweet, acid and melons).

Vegetables with proteins, okay.
Vegetables with starches, okay
Eat fruit alone.

Not certain which food fall into which categories? Here are examples.

Protein: Eggs, meat, fish, fowl, nuts, seeds, avocado, sprouts, milk  products.

Starch: Corn, wheat, barley, rice, buckwheat, millet, oats, beans, potatoes, yams, squash, flour products, sugar

Vegetables: Asparagus, tomatoes, okra,  green beans, green peas, broccoli, bell peppers, brussels sprouts, cabbage, lettuce, celery, cucumber, beets, eggplant, spinach, mushrooms, zucchini, radish, artichoke, beets, carrots, cauliflower, chives, ginger, garlic, leeks, onions

Sweet fruits: Bananas, currants, figs, dates, raisins, prunes, dried fruits, grapes

Acid fruits: Lemons, oranges, grapefruits, other citrus fruits, kiwi, plum, pineapple, mango, papaya, all berries, nectarines, apples, cherries, pears, apricots, peaches.

Melons : Cantaloupe, watermelon

Many of our traditional meals are comprised of wrong combinations.  What we think of as a “good meal” are typically a harmful combination of starch and protein.  We make the problem worse by accompanying meals with sugary drinks and desserts; these combinations cause the food to ferment and putrefy in the digestive system.

So remember HOW FOOD COMBINING MATTERS!

I’m Shirley Noah, I teach the 9 pillars for health.  A step-by-step approach to good health.  Let’s connect to see how I may best serve you in the near future.