Eat For Your Future, Too

Eat for Your Future

 

Eggs and Veggies
Plate of Eggs and Veggies

The nutritionally deprived, cooked and processed foods you eat today will damage your health tomorrow, as well as the health of your unborn children and grandchildren in the years to come.

This concept came from a book in the 1940’s by Francis Pottenger, published in his book Pottenger’s Cats.  Some nine hundred cats were fed various types of food, raw and some cooked.  There was a striking difference in their health as well as the health of the off-spring.  Within six months the cats eating the cooked food had infections, dental problems, vision problems, skin problems, allergies, arthritis, miscarriages and behavioral changes-including nervousness, viciousness and violent behavior.

The cats on the raw diet remained healthy and well-behaved, generation after generation. There is much to learn from Pottenger’s work; the most significant is the impact of poor nutrition, produced by cooked food proves the need for raw, fresh foods.

Think of all the people ( or maybe yourself) that you know who suffer from allergies, gum disease, heart problems, vision problems, arthritis, anti-social behavior, miscarriages and other health problems.  Could malnutrition, or perhaps even the malnutrition of their parents or grandparents be contributing to their problems? Or, even consider the baby boomer generation, the first humans to develop eating processed “TV Dinner” diets starting in the 1950’s.

How You Eat Matters

To eliminate these problems, follow a few simple guidelines, which will bring more nutrients into your cells and let wastes out of your body efficiently.  First eat the right combinations of food, because certain foods digest better together than others.  Next, chew your food well, to assist in the digestive process, and nutrients are absorbed better.  Solid food should be chewed thoroughly enough that it becomes liquid before you swallow it.  Nutrition starts in your mind and in your mouth.  Eat your food with the intent to nourish your body, rather than to “fill a void” in your stomach.

When you eat cooked foods, eating something raw first is best.  Cooked food appears as an alien to the human system and can invoke an immune response, just as if you are being exposed to a virus.

I’m Shirley Noah, I teach the 9 Pillars for Health.  A step-by-step approach to good health.  Let’s connect to see how I may best serve you in the near future.

 

 

Sticky: For Longer Life, Eat This Not That

Apple Health Coach

Good Foods, Bad Foods and How They Affect Your Health

In a study by the Journal of the American Medical Association, it reports that if you eating the right foods in the right amounts, your risk of dying from heart disease, stroke and type 2 diabetes could be cut in nearly half.

That’s pretty impressive, but what does “eat right foods” mean?  It turns out that “sub-optimal” diets are the undeniably cause in the development of illnesses.  So, that being said, if you’re at a loss for what is good for you and what’s really not here are some food and/or dietary components that affect your health the most.

  • Vegetables
  • Fruits
  • Soybean and corn oils
  • Processed and unprocessed meats
  • Omega-3 fats
  • Sugary drinks
  • Seafood
  • Grain, nuts and seeds

Eat More Of These Foods For Optimal Health

In most US family’s meals consist of protein (meat), vegetables  such as potatoes or corn, grains including bread, rice or pasts, and salad and often desert.

That’s not all bad, but consider portion size, too many people get too much of a good thing.  For better results consider:

  • 3 pieces of fruit a day
  • 2 cups of cooked or 4 cups of raw veggies per day
  • 5 one ounce servings of nuts or seeds per week (about 20 nuts per serving)
  • 8 ounces of clean wild caught seafood weekly

Meat and Seafood For Your Health

Protein is necessary for good health, but serving sizes are critical because your body can only use so much.  Excess protein requires your body to rid itself of excess nitrogen waste from your blood, stressing your kidneys, and may lead to dehydration.  Most people eat twice as much meat as they need, and how it’s cooked is another factor also.

Also processed meats, including bacon, salami, pepperoni, ham, pastrami, hot dogs, some sausages and hamburgers, are now classified as carcinogenic (along with tobacco and asbestos).

Regarding seafood, once what was considered good for you is now potentially toxic, including shrimp and tuna.  Fish farming operations and mercury contamination are all factors to consider when choosing seafood.

Omega-3 Fats, Nuts and Seeds

Almond Nuts
Almonds

Omega-3 comes from both animal and plant sources.  The primary animal sources are krill oil and fish oil which provide EPA and DHA, which are heart protective.

Healthy nuts and seeds, are great snacks and contain healthy fats, fiber, protein, antioxidants and minerals and are great for your heart and may even help control your weight.

Eating raw seeds, such as pumpkin, sunflower seeds, have a high level of good fats and oils, vitamins, minerals and antioxidants to boost your immune system, fight free radicals and benefit your heart and immune system.

Not Enough Fruits and Too Much Soda

Apple
Sliced Apple

Fruits offer many vitamins, enzymes and minerals, but should be eaten in moderation due to fructose content.  Drinking fruit juices with added sugars does not provide the same benefits as eating whole fruit.

Soda and processed foods contain HFCS (High Frutose Corn Syrup).  This is linked not only to weight gain, but to diabetes, insulin resistance and leptin resistance.

The best recommendation for fructose is 25 grams per day from all sources and 15 grams a day if you are diabetic.

I’m Shirley Noah, I teach the 9 Pillars for Health.  A step-by-step approach to good health.  Let’s connect to see how I may best serve you in the near future.

 

 

Is Your Flaxseed Rancid?

Is Your Flaxseed Rancid?

Fresh flaxseed oil clear, golden-yellow color free of cloudiness.  Flaxseed oil might contain particulates of ground flaxseed.  These particulates contain lignans, a beneficial class of phytoestrogen, and the label is marked “high-lignan.”  To check for rancidity, pour a tablespoon or two of flaxseed oil in a wine glass and hold it up to the light while tilting it slightly.  If you notice haziness or a dark-brown or dark yellow color, you have rancid flaxseed oil.  Rancid flaxseeds have a discolored, cracked, soft or otherwise damaged seed coats.

How to Know Whether Flaxseed Oil is Fresh or Rancid

Flax oil has a mild nuttiness like raw sunflower seeds or sesame seeds.  Fresh flaxseed oil gives a ligtness when inhaled.  To check the aroma of flaxseed oil, pour a few tablespoons in a wine glass, the shape makes a the aroma more perceivable.  Put your nose in the wineglass and inhale deeply.  Rancid flaxseed oil has a burnt and bitter odor.  A smell similar to used frying oil.  Any smell that deviates from nutty and leans toward bitter or burned indicates rancidity.

Fresh flaxseed tastes like it smells—clean, crisp and mildly nutty.  To taste flaxseed oil to check for rancidity, coat the back of a spoon with the oil and let the excess drip off.  Rub the back of the spoon over your tongue, making sure it touches the entire surface, and rub your tongue on the roof of your mouth. Or, if testing flaxseeds, chew a few and check for a burnt or bitter flavor.

Stores flaxseed oil and capsules in dark containers to minimize contact with light. Store the containers in the refrigerator or a dark cupboard.  Grind flaxseeds as needed; ground flaxseeds start to oxidize as soon as you grind them.  Flaxseed has a shelf life of one year when stored in a dark container.  Never cook flax or store it above room temperature.

Flax Seeds

Benefits of Fiber and Omega-3″s in Flaxseed

Flax seeds contain 42 grams of fat, 28 grams of carbohydrates and 18 grams of protein for every 100 grams in weight.  Today flaxseeds are considered a superfood, primarily due to three key elements.

Fiber

Omega 3-fats

Lignans.

Flaxseeds can be brown or golden.  You can grind them in a coffee bean grinder.  They can be used in soups, or steamed veggies and smoothies.  You can find them in the bulk bins or refrigerated packages.  Once brought home they should be refrigerated.

I’m Shirley Noah, I teach the 9 Pillars For Health.  A step-by-step approach to good health.  Let’s connect to see how I may best serve you in the near future.