Is Organic Really Important?

Why Go Organic?

Conventional farming operations commonly use pesticides on the foods they produce hoping for greater yields,  but these pesticides are toxic to humans and particularly children.  Studies show farm workers and communities in close proximity to pesticide application are at greater risk and over-spray can get on clothes and be carried home, endangering families.

Apple and Vegetables
Apple and Vegetables-Organic Foods

What Does Organic Mean?

Organic agriculture is based on a system of farming that maintains and replenishes soil fertility, prohibits the use of synthetic pesticides and fertilizers and promotes biodiversity.  Certified organic means that the farmer has undergone a regular inspection of farm, facilities, ingredients and practices by an independent third party certifier, accredited by the USDA National Organic Program.

Are Organic Foods Really Better?

If you’ve ever wondered if there are real health benefits to eating organic foods consider this: Organic produce is always non-GMO!  In a study comparing conventional vs Organic green vegetables: spinach, Chinese cabbage, bok choy, scallions and green pepper all had significantly higher antioxidants.  Organic tomatoes are richer in lycopene 20% and vitamin C 30%.  Conventional growers use synthetic pesticides to protect their crops from molds, insects and diseases.  This can leave a residue on the produce. In 2014 the USDA’s strawberry tests found that 98 percent of strawberries sampled had residues of at least one pesticide.  The dirtiest strawberry sample had 17 different pesticides.  Organic apples have higher levels of antioxidants such as quercetin and other flavonoids.  Even ketchup made from organic tomatoes has a higher antioxidant content than conventional ketchup.

The ” Dirty Dozen” and the “Clean 15” List

These are the most important foods to buy ORGANIC FOOD:

  • Strawberries
  • Spinach
  • Nectarines
  • Apples
  • Peaches
  • Celery
  • Grapes
  • Pears
  • Cherries
  • Tomatoes
  • Sweet Bell Peppers
  • Potatoes

These foods are generally the lowest amount of pesticide spray residue.  These are the Clean 15

  • Onions
  • Avocado
  • Sweet Corn (other than GMO)
  • Pineapple
  • Mango
  • Sweet Peas (frozen)
  • Eggplant
  • Cauliflower
  • Asparagus
  • Kiwi
  • Honeydew Melon
  • Grapefruit
  • Cabbage
  • Papaya

Organic food is fresher, more filling and free of additives that could keep nutrients from being absorbed by your body.

Organic food tastes better because it’s real.  Conventional growing methods often produce tough, mealy and/or tasteless fruits and vegetables, compared to organic.  So, is organic food really important?  I believe so.

I am Shirley Noah, I teach the 9 Pillars for Health.  A step-by-step approach to good health.  Let’s connect to see how I may best serve you in the near future.

 

 

 

5 Myths About Exercise and Aging

Fitness Is Timeless

At any age it makes a difference in how you feel and move.  Inside and out, you win when you are active, no matter how old you are.  But it doesn’t always FEEL that way, if you have fallen off track in your goals toward movement every day.

Exercise and Aging
Exercise and Aging

“I’m Too Old”

In all actuality, not moving is much riskier and can speed up the aging process.  Being inactive makes you more likely to develop heart disease.  If you haven’t exercised in a long time, begin slowly with a low impact activity that raises your heart rate.  For overall heart health, The American Heart Association recommends 30 minutes of aerobic activity 5 days per week, along with 2 days of strength training.  Look for ways to get back into something you enjoy.

“It’s Too Hard”

Studies have show that taking it easy is risky.  For the most part, when older people lose their ability to do things on their own, it doesn’t just happen because they’ve aged.  It is usually because they’re not active.  Lack of physical activity also can lead to more visits to the doctor, more hospitalizations, and more use of medicines for a variety of illnesses.

Exercise and Aging
Exercise and Aging

“I Can’t Afford It”

You really don’t need to shell out a fortune on a gym membership or exercise equipment.  Put on some walking shoes or spend an hour gardening in the backyard.  If the weather is bad, use what’s available around your home.  Canned goods work well as light weights for resistance training.  If you like the social interaction there are group classes and many resources to stay fit.  Many gyms offer discount to seniors, and some health plans cover membership for certain fitness programs.

“I’ll Hurt Myself”

First talk to a trained professional about which activities would be best for you and what to avoid.  Remember, the more physically fit you are, the less likely you are to get injured.  Be sure to warm up a bit by stretching and moving slowly.  The more physically fit you are, the less you are likely to get injured.  Improving your balance by tai chi or yoga help you avoid falls in every day life.

“I Don’t Have Anyone To Exercise With”

Check the schedule at you local community center or the YMCA to see what free or affordable classes they offer.  Find opportunities to connect with people who enjoy the same activities you do.  Once you get started with your active lifestyle, you many be surprised to learn that there are already people around you who can exercise with you.  Or, maybe you will inspire someone in your life to get moving.

Exercise can be a tool to keep you mentally and physically sharp in the years ahead.  Trust that if you get moving, that you will FEEL the difference and you will enjoy the activity and age gracefully.

I am  Shirley Noah, I teach the 9 Pillars for Health.  A step-by-step approach to good health.  Let’s connect to see how I may best serve you in the near future.